Post Vietnam Greens Shirt

The Australian Army continued to wear simple green shirts as its main combat uniform for quite some time after the end of the Vietnam War, only replacing it with a camouflage pattern in the mid-1980s when the new DPCU uniform began to be introduced. The Vietnam era ‘pixie’ shirts are highly desirable and not easy to find on the collectors market. Later shirts dating from the 1970s or 1980s are easier to find and it is one of these shirts we are looking at today. It is a simple long sleeved shirt, produced in a plain green cotton:

A pair of breast pockets are fitted, with distinctive angled bottom corners to them that make it harder for lint and debris to gather in the corners, each has a flap secured with a single green plastic button:

Inside one of the pockets are a pair of channels for pens:

A pair of epaulettes are fitted, secured with a single button and with a pointed tip to them:

A label is fitted inside the shirt, with sizing, manufacturer etc. This example is quite worn and has been overwritten with the owner’s name in permanent marker:

By the time this uniform was produced and issued, many other armies had already transitioned across to camouflage patterned uniforms (the British Army back in the early 1970s). Australia was slow to adopt camouflage uniform, although the diverse nature of the Australian landscape meant it took a long time to find a pattern that would work as well n the arid outback as it would in the coastal jungles. The green uniform was a perfectly adequate uniform in the meantime and seems to have been popular with soldiers.

One of the major manufacturers of clothing and equipment for the Australian Army was The Australian Government Clothing Factory and this newspaper article from the early 1990s outlines its history and range of products manufactured at the time:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.