Royal Military Police on Parade in Nijmegen Photographs

In World War II the Dutch city of Nijmegen was the scene of heavy fighting as part of Operation Market Garden as British forces rushed to prevent the Germans destroying two bridges across the Waal river. Many British soldiers died in fighting around the city and the locals were to remain ever grateful for the efforts to liberate their city. It is unsurprising then that different regiments of the British Army have been invited to the city for parades over the years. Today we are looking at a group of photographs showing military policemen from the Royal Corps of Military Police parading in the city in the early post-war period. The identification of the location comes from a photographer’s stamp on the rear of one photograph so there is an element of guesswork on my part, but it seems a sensible conclusion. Amongst the snaps of the British contingent are a number of images of local Dutch soldiers dressed in a mix of US and British uniform and webbing and looking quite distinct from the British troops.

4 comments

  1. I wonder, are some of these from a parade in Nijmegan and some possibly from a Niemegan March ?

  2. Early days of the Nijmegan Marches? RMP are wearing 1949 pattern Battle Dress with their march medal. Probably dates from the 1950s.

    • The marches started way before the 50’s but the military contingents were given special recognition after WW2, particularly the Canadian and British ones.
      Even today the Dutch seem to remember those past sacrifices a little more than, sadly, the countrymen of the ones who made those sacrifices 😦

  3. Indeed, although they started in the early 1900s, the first British Military participation in the Nijmegen Marches was in 1950.

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