Arctic Boot Covers

Identifying items of Arctic equipment is not always easy, as they were often small production runs, only used by a small group of soldiers and are not always marked in a particularly clear manner. Today’s object is one such case, advertised as ‘sniper’s boot covers’. In reality, after a bit of digging, it became clear that they were actually for use in the Arctic and sure enough when I turned to my go-to photograph for seventies Arctic kit, I spotted them:

The covers are a pair of slip on green cloth sleeves:

The bottom of each cover has a piece of dark green leather stitched to it to make it slightly harder wearing for walking on:

They slip on over the front half of the boot:

They are tightened up with a cord that runs through brass eyelets on either side of the cover:

The cord is tied to one eyelet and is then passed through the other eyelets on either side to draw it all together:

The inside of the cover is lined with grey wool felt:

A stores code is printed on the central band on the inside with a possible date of 1973:

The original owner’s name ‘Turnbull’ is written down the front of the top of the cover in black marker:

These covers were designed to be used with the ski marching boots and were most commonly issued to Royal Marines for use with the Nowegian M66 boots. As one user remarked, “Useless bits of kit but so was a lot of our Arctic gear which dated from WW2!”

2 comments

  1. It seems like somewhere I saw mention of ‘toe covers’ for use in cold weather by drivers and the like. But they weren’t like these and had nothing for beneath the boot.

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