Royal Navy Windproof Working Jacket

Introduced in the 1960s, the windproof working jacket was a simple garment designed to replace the old oilskin clothing that had been issued out for wear in bad weather. The working jacket was a simple single breasted coat, made in mid blue nylon, without a hood:

There is a single zip up the front:

A pair of brass eyelets are fitted under each arm pit to try and provide some ventilation to the garment:

This seems to have been something of a pointless exercise as one matelot remembers:

Yep, pussers crisp packet, I was issued one of those in 1986, probably went out of issue early 1990s. A pointless waterproof jacket, ended up wetter whilst wearing it!

There are no pockets on the outside of the garment, just a single inside pocket:

These jackets were made by Jeltek, leading them to be known by that name by some although apparently the more common nickname was “windyburps”. The manufacturer’s details are on the internal label:

These jackets were cascaded down to Sea Cadet units at the end of their working life, but when introduced were cutting edge garments, certainly compared to what had preceeded them. The final illustration shows the jacket being worn in a plate from a 1960s Seaman’s Handbook:

One comment

  1. We knew it in the ’70’s as “windyburbs” as against your “burbs” which was a raincoat made by the Burberry company(before the company became a fashion statement). The windyburbs was a fail in all ways although I never got wet wearing mine, and crackled every time you moved!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.