Clansman Trailing Aerial

We have previously looked at the standard, four section, folding aerial for the Clansman manpack radios such as the 350. This was a reasonably effective aerial, but had a couple of major disadvantages. Firstly as soon as the radio operator entered woodland he was going to get it tangled up in the branches above and secondly it was very obvious to the enemy who the radioman was because he had a large aerial sticking up behind him. To get around both of these problems a trailing aerial was also issued:

The range on this aerial was much poorer than the normal aerial, however tactically it was more discrete and it was less likely to get tangled in the branches above. It consists of nohting more sophisticated than a length of insulated copper wire to act as the aerial, with a socket on one end to attach it to the radio:

A small piece of green heat shrunk plastic is fitted to the cable with the NSN number printed on it:

The aerial simply plugs into the aerial socket as usual and then tightened down with the thumb screw to prevent if coming loose accidently:

The army manual acknowledged that the trailing aerial was not as good as the normal whip aerial and recommended soldiers try and get it as high on their body as possible and to keep is as straight as possible for better reception.

One comment

  1. This also serves as a counterpoise (aka a ‘rat tail’) on a PRC 351 by plugging it into an ‘Adaptor, Counterpoise BNC’ NSN 5985-99-661-6418 fitted to either the antenna coaxial socket on the radio or the SURF 4 Watt. The purpose of the counterpoise is to improve the physical range of the radio when using a manpack whip antenna.

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