Canadian CG634 Helmet

In 1997 Canada adopted a new combat helmet. Although visually similar to the US PASGT, it was actually based on the French Gallet TC-3 helmet. 60,000 helmets were purchaed from the French Gallet company, before manufacture began in Quebec from 1997-2004. The helmet was paired with the cadpat helmet cover I covered here:

As we have covered the cover before, I will put that to one side and focus on the helmet. The shell of the helmet was made of aramid, a type of kevlar, and under the cover has a green shell:

The outer surface of the helmet is roughened and there is a black binding around the edges of the shell to protect it from knocks and damage:

The suspension system combines a thick foam trauma liner with a rubber and nylon webbing suspension based on the French Mle-78 (Gallet TC-3).

The CG634 has a 4-point chinstrap with flip down adjustment pieces. At the nape of the neck the two straps join and attach to the shell in one place, metal buckles are used to alter the fitting of the helmet:

The suspension system has a chin cup and secures with a metal buckle to one side of the helmet:

Squeezing the two puttons together allows the metal tab to be pulled out and the helmet released:

The helmet has a bi-lingual label stuck to the inside of the shell:

This helmet dates back to 1997 and is technically a ‘small’- I have a 7 1/4″ and it still fits me so the sizing is questionable! The liner has a second label attached:

One soldier remembers when the helmets were first issued (although he seems to have gotten his dates a little out of order as they didn’t arrive in service until 1997, although this might have been the prototypes):

Nice helmets. When we were issued them back in 95, there was a problem with the quality control. If you dropped the helmet or it took a a hard blow, the helmet would crack. If you tried to return it to stores, they would not accept it unless you paid for it. It was better fitting than the old M1 helmet but you couldn’t use it to wash out of it or in an emergency dig out a shell scrape

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