Indian Army Armoured Car Driver Impression

Throughout the interwar period the armoured car had offered a cost effective but very potent weapon to the British forces in India during their never ending struggle to maintain order along the North West Frontier. With the coming of the Second World War, attention naturally focused away from internal policing and outwards to possible Japanese aggression. Despite this shift in emphasis, India’s borders still needed protecting and men remained on patrol throughout the war.

This armoured car crewman has just exited his Crossley armoured car to make some slight adjustments to the carburettor in 1940 and is dressed in typical garb for crewman of the period. He wears an Indian produced set of overalls. These have been modified in the local bazaar to add an elasticated cuff to the legs and to shorten the sleeves. They have a single breast pocket, one thigh pocket and a dressing pocket in the hip. The only waist adjustment is a half belt on the rear. Over this he wears a 37 pattern belt that has had the rear buckles removed to make it more comfortable to wear when sat down for long periods, a RAC type holster is worn on the belt with a Webley revolver in it (apologies the black fittings on the holster are anachronistic as they date from the 1950s but I do not have one with brass fittings). He wears standard ammunition boots on his feet and a battered Wolseley helmet on his head to protect him from the sun. To help shield his eyes from dust and bright sunlight he has a pair of tinted goggles slung around his neck.

1. Indian made overalls 2. Wolseley helmet 3. Goggles 4. Webley revolver 5. 37 pattern belt with RAC holster 6. Ammunition boots

This impression is quite a simple one compared to some I have created in the past and uses relatively few components, despite that it makes up an interesting and unusual reconstruction and shows that it does not necessarily cost a huge amount of money or take a lot of kit to put together something that is authentic and decidedly different.

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