SA80 Other Arms Bayonet Scabbard

The SA80 bayonet we looked at a few weeks ago was used in combat with a black plastic scabbard that protected the blade and allowed it to be carried in the PLCE frog. When the SA80 rifle was introduced it was decided to offer two different scabbards for the bayonet. Frontline infantry would receive a version with built in saw, wire cutter and sharpening stone. Rear echelon troops received a simpler (and cheaper) scabbard without these features, the argument being that they would rarely need to use any of these features so it was safe to delete them. This simplified scabbard was made from a black Phenolite plastic:imageThe design retained the fixing points to allow the extra features to be added if required:imageThe differences between the two scabbards can be seen here:imageOther features remain the same however, so six raised grooves are provided near the throat to allow grip to remove the bayonet from the scabbard and to help add extra rigidity to this portion:imageA small plastic detent is used to keep the bayonet in the scabbard and prevent it from rattling around:imageThe bayonet fits neatly inside, but will only fit in one way due to the design of the bayonet itself with its offset grip:imageIn order to attach the scabbard to the PLCE frog, a female Fastex clip is moulded into the top of the scabbard:imageThis marries up with a male Fastex clip sewn into the frog itself and keeps the scabbard firmly attached.

This scabbard has clearly seen some service as an armourer’s rack number is painted on it in white:imageThese simplified scabbards are much easier to find on the collectors’ market than the full combat versions which have not been released for resale in anywhere near the same amount and can easily make five times the price of their simpler counterparts.

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