Second Pattern 88 Water Bottle Carrier

We continue our review of the 88 Pattern webbing set this week with the second pattern water bottle carrier. The earlier pattern was covered here, and side by side the differences are clear (the first pattern is on the left, the second on the right):imageThe most obvious change between the two patterns is the replacement of the webbing loop on the front with a full pocket for carrying a hexamine stove:imageBoth the front pocket and the base of the carrier have eyelets to drain water out:imageThe pattern of Auscam is also brighter and slightly greener than the older carrier. On the rear the belt fastenings have changed:imageInstead of the sprung metal ALICE style clips, plastic fasteners are fitted instead:imageThe rest of the carrier is broadly similar in design, borrowing heavily from the US M1910 style of carrier. Two top flaps secure the bottle into the carrier, fastening with a pair of press studs:imageThe inside of the carrier is lined with felt to help insulate the bottle and keep it cool in the heat of the Australian outback:imageThis particular carrier dates from 2010:imageThe US M1910 must be one of the most enduring designs of webbing in history, inspiring dozens of derivative designs across the world; we have covered the 44 Pattern British carrier, 51, 64 and 82 pattern Canadian and 88 Pattern Australian designs which are all inspired by this design and this does not include all the non-commonwealth countries that have also adopted variations of this design.

With water being such a high priority in Australia, it is typical for soldiers and cadets to carry a minimum of two bottles on their webbing at all times, with extra bottles added to the rucksack if extended operations are expected.untitled

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