Mk 16B Aircrew Coverall

The Mark 16b aircrew coverall was introduced into service in the late 1990s. In its initial form it was produced in olive green, but with the RAF’s commitments as part of the War on Terror in Iraq and Afghanistan a tan coloured version of the garment was soon introduced:imageThe Mark 16B is a development of the Mark 16A but deleting the knee padding and thigh pockets of the earlier model. The suit is made of a flame retardant DuPont Nomex Delta C Aramid fabric and the fastenings are made of special fire resistant Velcro. These fire retardant properties are essential for personnel working around aircraft where hot gasses and extremely flammable aviation fuel are common hazards.

The coveralls fasten up the front with a single metal zip, further zips secure two diagonally cut chest pockets:imageFurther slash pockets are fitted at the waist:imageThe waist itself is adjustable with two Velcro tabs at the rear that allow it to be drawn in and let out slightly:imageThe left hand sleeve has a padded pocket for up to three pens:imageVelcro tab epaulettes are fitted to each shoulder for rank slides to be attached:imageThe lower legs of the suit each have a flapped pocket that is designed to be easy to access when the wearer is seated:imageThe bottom of each leg also features a short zip allowing the diameter of the leg to be expanded to make it easier to get the coveralls on or off:imageA large manufacturer’s label is sewn into the garment giving sizing, NSN number and care instructions:imageThis set of coveralls has never been issued. In service a variety of patches and badges would be sewn on to show the wearer’s qualifications, rank and Squadron:Royal Air Force’s II(AC) Squadron foils insurgent bombers in Afghanistan

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