Medical Technician’s Trousers

Update: My thanks to Richard Aixill for providing some more information on these trousers which has allowed an update.

Most militaria collectors tend to focus on combat clothing or other distinctly military items of clothing. Alongside these though, are a large number of pieces of work clothing that look very similar to their civilian counterparts, but are purchased for military use. Items such as specialist clothing for medical use are normally identical to their civilian counterparts but have labels and markings that indicate they were part of the military stores systems. Tonight we have an example of just this sort of item with a pair of medical technician’s trousers:imageThese are made of heavy duty white cotton and are simple, loose fitting trousers. The waist and fly are secured with white plastic buttons:imageAnd a metal slider is included for waist adjustment:imageSimple slash pockets are included at each hip:imageAnd a buttoned rear pocket is fitted to the seat of the trousers:imageThe label in the waistband of the trousers shows they are military issue as they have an NSN number and gives details of sizing:imageThe 22G code indicates they were issued to the RAF and they date from around 1979. They were manufactured by Remploy, a government owned factory that offered employment to disabled men and women and a firm that won many contracts from the military in the post-war period.

I have struggled to find much information on medical technicians in the Army during this period, I have got a description of what an ‘Operating Theatre Technician’ was expected to do in 1979:

Operating Theatre Technicians are selected from RAMC trained soldiers. They prepare operating theatres and assist surgeons, anaesthetists, and hospital sisters during operations in hospitals and field units both at home and abroad…

A medical technician though was a more general term for any other rank member of the armed forces in a medical role and these trousers were probably worn by both these and those with a more specific role in military healthcare of the period: the white colour indicating their use in a ward or hospital rather than in front line service.

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