Coveralls, Fuel and Lubricant Handlers

In today’s increasingly safety conscious world even the armed forces have to ensure they provide the correct PPE (personal protective equipment) to their personnel involved in potentially hazardous tasks. One of the most hazardous duties involves working with fuels and lubricants. Not only can they be highly flammable, they also have the potential to be corrosive or at least an irritant to a human being. Normal cloth overalls are fairly useless in these circumstances as they absorb rather than repel these substances and so still allow contact with the skin underneath. Special coveralls are provided to those who have to work in these areas, they have a tough impermeable layer over the front and sleeves:imageThis extends over the back of the shoulders as well, but the rear of the coveralls are unprotected, presumably to allow the uniform to breathe and help keep the wearer cool:imageNote also the elastic at the back of the waist to help improve the fit. The coveralls fasten up the front with a zip, which is in turn covered by a flap secured with press studs:imageTwo pockets are provided, one on the thigh and one on the breast:imageThese are each secured with Velcro. The neck of the coverall has the label, indicating it is a ‘Large’, giving the official designation ‘Coveralls, Fuel and Lubricant Handlers’ and the manufacturer ‘Multifabs Ltd.’ Of Derby:imageMultifabs specialised in protective clothing, including specialist equipment for the foundry industry and was in business from about 1980 to 1997 which at least gives us a time frame for this set of coveralls. I must confess that this is the only one of these I have ever come across, and it sounds as if they were not always issued even to those who did work with fuels. Even so it is an interesting and unusual addition to the collection.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.