Mechanised Transport Corps Book Review

I suspect that I, like many others, was only aware of the role of the Mechanised Transport Corps in World War two from the character of Sam Stewart in the popular TV series Foyle’s War; therefore it was with great interest that I started reading Jon Mills book Within the Island Fortress No4 The Mechanised Transport Corps. This book is not a thick book, being just 32 pages long in a slim A4 sized paperback, published in 2008 as part of a small series of books dealing with more obscure parts of the Home Front.capturedWhilst it is not a long book, the quality is excellent and the book is profusely illustrated with both period photographs and modern stills of original uniforms and insignia:captureaThe story laid out is actually quite a complex one with shifting roles for the corps and numerous spats with the War office over the MTC’s status and uniform which was felt to be too similar to that of an ATS officer. That Jon Mills makes this readable and more importantly understandable is to his great credit. There were several offshoots of the organisation and these are also covered, again with illustrations of their unique insignia. I am frankly astounded that the author has even found original examples of some of these badges and uniforms as the numbers issued sometimes barely reached double figures. Whilst not every photograph is captioned, the accompanying text made it easy to work out what was going on in those photographs without labels.

As well as their service in the UK, members of the MTC drove ambulances for the French before the German Invasion, and then for the Free French. They were then involved in driving ambulances for the South African Army and the Corps provided drivers for a wide range of civilian and ministry cars. They were only reluctantly acknowledged by the War office, but the Ministry of Supply and the Royal Ordnance Factories all took advantages of their services. Each of these allocations tended to produce another unique set of cloth sleeve insignia and these are covered comprehensively in the book:capturebThe author has a reputation for greatly expanding our knowledge of the civilian services during the Second World War and this book is a superb addition to the historiography of the period. I acknowledge that this is a niche subject, but like all Jon Mill’s books it is well written and worth picking up a copy if you can find one as you are guaranteed to learn something new. Sadly this book, and indeed the rest of the series, appears to have been out of print for a number of years but copies are available second hand and for the serious student of the Home Front are well worth acquiring.

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