2 Pounder No1 Shell Casings

Tonight we have a pair of small brass shell casings:imageThese casings are both from a naval 2 pounder ‘pom pom’ gun, the cases identity being easily determined by the head stamps on the bottom:imageFrom this we can see that they were manufactured in 1944 and are 2 Pounder No1 round. The manufacturer is ‘S&S’ which is believed to be Sidney Silversmiths of Sheffield.

The Royal Navy had identified the need for a rapid-firing, multi-barrelled close-range anti-aircraft weapon at an early stage. Design work for such a weapon began in 1923 based on the earlier Mark II, undoubtedly to utilise the enormous stocks of 2-pounder ammunition left over from the First World War. Lack of funding led to a convoluted and drawn-out design and trials history, and it was not until 1930 that these weapons began to enter service. Known as the QF 2-pounder Mark VIII, it is usually referred to as the multiple pom-pom. The initial mounting was the 11.8 to 17.35 ton, eight-barrelled mounting Mark V (later Mark VI), suitable for ships of cruiser and aircraft carrier size upward. From 1935, the quadruple mounting Mark VII, essentially half a Mark V or VI, entered service for ships of destroyer and cruiser size.HMAS_Nizam_AWM-009496These multiple gun mounts required four different guns and were nicknamed the “Chicago Piano”. The mount had two rows each of two or four guns. Guns were produced in both right- and left-hand and “inner” and “outer” so that the feed and ejector mechanisms matched. Single-barrelled mounts, the Mark VIII (manual) and Mark XVI (power operated), were also widely used, mainly in small escorts (such as the Flower-class corvettes) and coastal craft (especially early Fairmile ‘D’ motor gunboats). An interesting feature was the very large magazine, from 140 rounds per gun for the eight-barrelled mount, to 56 rounds for the single mounts. This large ammunition capacity gave the eight-barrelled mount the ability to fire continuously for 73 seconds without reloading. A high velocity (HV), 1.8 lb. (820 g), round was developed for the pom-pom, just prior to World War II, which raised the new gun muzzle velocity from 2,040 ft/s (622 m/s) to 2400 ft/s (732 m/s). Many older mountings were modified with conversions kits to fire HV ammunition, while most newly manufactured mounts were factory built to fire HV ammunition. A mount modified or designed for HV ammunition was given a ‘*’ designation; for example a Mk V mount modified for HV ammunition would be designated Mk V*.

The following photograph shows the complete rounds, notice how short the brass case is compared to the rest of the round.The_Royal_Navy_during_the_Second_World_War_A2263The flaring visible on the ends of each casing seems to be very common and was done to turn the casings into a small vase as a souvenir.

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